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April 7, 2013

Bobby Jindal’s plan to kill Louisiana’s income tax hits a major snag

  • cause In recent weeks, Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal, a Republican who is expected to run for president in 2016, has been pushing a bold tax plan in his state that would eliminate income taxes entirely on individuals and corporations, in an effort to make the state more desirable for businesses. To make up for the loss of income, the state’s sales taxes would jump by 56 percent, the cigarette tax would jump significantly and a number of tax loopholes would be closed.
  • reaction Jindal’s popularity has tanked. With a 38 percent approval rating in the state, President Barack Obama is now a more popular figure in the conservative Louisiana. Why’s that? Well, two reasons: First, the sales tax increase is seen as hitting the poor more than the rich (though Jindal says there will be tax credits available for low-income residents); and second, many residents see it as a transparent scheme to shore up Jindal’s credentials with conservatives outside of Louisiana before running for president. Many of those polled also note that he’s been out of the state a lot lately. source
12:16 // 1 year ago
January 24, 2013
A debate about which party can better manage the federal government is a very small and short-sighted debate. If our vision is not bigger than that, we do not deserve to win.
Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal • In a speech he plans to give to the Republican National Committee Thursday evening, during which he will use the phrase “recalibrate the compass of conservatism.” Jindal sounds like he’s running for president in 2016, and also like he’s hoping to score an era-defining speech akin to Rush Limbaugh’s defiant bit at 2009’s CPAC. Jindal’s response to the State of the Union that year didn’t get a lot of love from anyone, but he’s otherwise proven himself to be one of the country’s best Republican governors, so it’ll be interesting to see what sort of bandwidth he gets from this speech.
8:31 // 1 year ago
November 15, 2012

Prominent Republicans respond to Mitt Romney’s “gifts” comments

  • Gov. BranstadI don’t think it’s helpful. I guess my feeling is that we need to turn the page, and we need to focus on the future and not make excuses for the past.”
  • Gov. Jindal "We need to continue to show how our policies help every voter out there achieve the American Dream, which is to be in the middle class, which is to be able to give their children an opportunity to be able to get a great education. … So, I absolutely reject that notion, that description. I think that’s absolutely wrong."
  • Gov. ScottIt’s wrong, it’s not true. What we’ve got to do is say we want every vote, we want to take care of every citizen in our state”
  • Sen. RubioI don’t believe that we have millions and millions of people in this country that don’t want to work. I’m not saying that’s what [Romney] said. I think we have millions of people in this country that are out of work and are dependent on the government because they can’t find a job.” 
  • Sen. AyotteThe campaign is over and what the voters are looking for us to do is to accept their votes and go forward and we’ve got some big challenges that need to be solved. I don’t know the full context of them but I don’t agree with them.” source
17:58 // 1 year ago
November 13, 2012

Opposing views from Republicans who might be on the 2016 ticket

  • Rep. Paul Ryan "Well, he got turnout. The president should get credit for achieving record-breaking turnout numbers from urban areas for the most part, and that did win the election for him.”
  • Gov. Bobby Jindal "It’s not going to be the last time anyone says something stupid within our party, but it can’t be tolerated within our party. We’ve also had enough of this dumbed-down conservatism. We need to stop being simplistic, we need to trust the intelligence of the American people and we need to stop insulting the intelligence of the voters." source
15:49 // 1 year ago
August 1, 2012
A new face of the Republican party? With former Texas Solicitor General Ted Cruz pulling off a dramatic win in a runoff for a Senate seat on Tuesday, Cruz becomes just the latest example of the GOP’s increasing diversity. WIth a number of increasingly successful Republicans who aren’t white — including Cruz, Sen. Marco Rubio, Gov. Nikki Haley and Gov. Bobby Jindal, among others — the Republican Party may be slowly starting to break from the past. “In the 2016 or 2020 Republican presidential primary, it’s easy to see a contest that includes Jindal and Rubio in its top tier,” notes Chris Cillizza of the Washington Post. (photo by Pat Sullivan/AP)

A new face of the Republican party? With former Texas Solicitor General Ted Cruz pulling off a dramatic win in a runoff for a Senate seat on Tuesday, Cruz becomes just the latest example of the GOP’s increasing diversity. WIth a number of increasingly successful Republicans who aren’t white — including Cruz, Sen. Marco Rubio, Gov. Nikki Haley and Gov. Bobby Jindal, among others — the Republican Party may be slowly starting to break from the past. “In the 2016 or 2020 Republican presidential primary, it’s easy to see a contest that includes Jindal and Rubio in its top tier,” notes Chris Cillizza of the Washington Post. (photo by Pat Sullivan/AP)

9:27 // 1 year ago
May 6, 2011
Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal releases his birth certificate: Hey, Bobby, this was last week’s news. But in all seriousness, someone was probably thinking, “Hey, this guy might be vice-president someday.” Might as well get this out of the way now. Jindal’s case is slightly rougher than Barack Obama’s was, because neither of his parents were citizens when he was born, and one of the senators from his state wants to limit birthright citizenship. Both of Jindal’s parents had green cards at the time of his birth, by the way. Anyway, here it is, in case anyone needs it.

Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal releases his birth certificate: Hey, Bobby, this was last week’s news. But in all seriousness, someone was probably thinking, “Hey, this guy might be vice-president someday.” Might as well get this out of the way now. Jindal’s case is slightly rougher than Barack Obama’s was, because neither of his parents were citizens when he was born, and one of the senators from his state wants to limit birthright citizenship. Both of Jindal’s parents had green cards at the time of his birth, by the way. Anyway, here it is, in case anyone needs it.

23:54 // 3 years ago