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August 7, 2013

U.S. - Russia summit cancelled in response to Edward Snowden asylum decision

  • Last Week Russia granted temporary asylum to NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden, despite the protestations of the U.S. government, presumably ending any chance that Snowden will ever face federal charges in the United States.
  • This Week President Obama called off a previously scheduled trip to Russia for one-on-one meetings with Russian President Vladimir Putin, going so far as to tell Tonight Show host Jay Leno that Russia has a tendency to slip into a “Cold War mentality” from time to time. source
16:23 // 1 year ago
August 1, 2013
We are extremely disappointed that the Russian government would take this step despite our very clear and lawful requests in public and private that Mr. Snowden be expelled and returned to the United States.
White House spokesman Jay Carney • Responding to the news that Russia has granted temporary asylum to accused NSA whisteblower Edward Snowden, despite the numerous protestations of the Obama Administration. The White House is reportedly considering canceling upcoming one-on-one meetings between Russian President Vladimir Putin and President Obama; however, the President is currently far busier convincing Congress not to revoke the NSA’s authority to spy on American citizens. source
14:45 // 1 year ago
July 24, 2013
15:07 // 1 year ago
July 22, 2013

Attorney confirms Edward Snowden could leave Russia by week’s end

  • Last week It looked as if a continued inability to secure a means of travel to another friendly country would force Edward Snowden to seek asylum in Russia, presumably ending any chance of additional leaks from the NSA whistleblower.
  • This week It appears Snowden might be able to leave Russia after all, after attorney Anatoly Kucherena revealed Snowden is currently awaiting travel papers, and could leave Moscow’s Sheremetyevo Airport on a flight (presumably) bound for an asylum-granting Latin American nation later this week.  source
16:30 // 1 year ago
July 16, 2013
It seems the NSA operational blueprints which were allegedly taken by Edward Snowden won’t be seeing the light of day after all, at least if the accused NSA whistleblower’s lawyer is to be believed. According to ABC News, Russian attorney Anatoly Kucherena met with Snowden on Tuesday, and confirmed that paperwork has been filed to request asylum for Snowden in Russia. Kucherena says Snowden is prepared to abide “by the conditions” originally outlined by Russian President Vladimir Putin, including a demand to stop leaking information Snowden obtained while working as a contractor for the NSA. (Photo via Maximum PC) source

It seems the NSA operational blueprints which were allegedly taken by Edward Snowden won’t be seeing the light of day after all, at least if the accused NSA whistleblower’s lawyer is to be believed. According to ABC News, Russian attorney Anatoly Kucherena met with Snowden on Tuesday, and confirmed that paperwork has been filed to request asylum for Snowden in Russia. Kucherena says Snowden is prepared to abide “by the conditions” originally outlined by Russian President Vladimir Putin, including a demand to stop leaking information Snowden obtained while working as a contractor for the NSA. (Photo via Maximum PC) source

16:11 // 1 year ago
July 15, 2013
As soon as there is an opportunity for him to move elsewhere, I hope he will do that. The conditions for granting political asylum are known to him. And judging by his latest actions, he is shifting his position. But the situation has not been clarified yet.
Russian President Vladimir Putin • Discussing the ongoing saga of NSA whisteblower Edward Snowden during a press conference on an island in the Gulf of Finland on Monday. The Russian president also laid much of the blame for the current situation on the United States, saying it was the U.S. government’s fault that Snowden hadn’t already arrived in one of the three Latin American countries he’s accepted asylum offers from. Snowden remains in the transit area of Moscow’s Sheremetyevo International Airport, but claims he’s currently seeking temporary asylum in Russia while he tries to find a safe means of travel to Venezuela, Bolivia or Nicaragua. source
16:52 // 1 year ago
July 2, 2013
15:44 // 1 year ago
July 1, 2013

Russian officials confirm new Snowden asylum request

  • 15 countries were mentioned in Edward Snowden’s latest petition for asylum, according to an unidentified Russian Foreign Ministry official, and the NSA whistleblower remains in the transit area of Russia’s Sheremetyevo International Airport at this time.  While it appears he’s under no threat of extradition by Russian authorities, it remains unclear if/where Snowden will ultimately be granted political asylum. source
17:33 // 1 year ago
June 26, 2013
We understand that the arrival of Mr. Snowden in Russia creates issues for the Russian government to consider. We have made clear that there is a legal basis, a clear legal basis for Russia to expel Mr. Snowden, in our view. And we’ve made that view known and are now having conversations accordingly.
Jay Carney • Confirming the Obama Administration has no plans to end its quest for the extradition of Edward Snowden, the man accused of treason by the Justice Department for blowing the whistle on NSA surveillance programs, despite yesterday’s less-than-encouraging remarks from Russian President Vladimir Putin. Snowden is currently seeking asylum in Ecuador; however, government officials say processing his application could take several weeks. source
14:03 // 1 year ago
December 6, 2012
14:50 // 1 year ago