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September 3, 2012

Are we better off than we were four years ago? Let’s ask Obama’s surrogates

  • we aren’t On Sunday, Maryland Gov. Martin O’Malley said we weren’t better off than we were four years ago, but blamed Bush, not Obama. ”Without a doubt, we are not as well off as we were before George Bush brought us the Bush job losses, Bush recessions, the Bush deficits, the series of desert wars, charged for the first time to credit cards,” he told ”Face the Nation.”
  • we are But everyone deserves to be contradicted sometimes, and in this case, Los Angeles mayor Antonio Villaraigosa disagrees with the Maryland governor. ”We are better off. We’ve had 29 consecutive months of growth - 4 1/2 million jobs. In fact, more jobs in that time than the 8 years under [President] Bush.” What do you think? Are we better off than we were? source

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10:48 // 1 year ago
April 30, 2012
I think that Sen. Rubio’s version of the DREAM Act would create a second class status for folks.
Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa • During an appearance on CBS’ Face the Nation this weekendduring which he also predicted that Mitt Romney’s stance on the DREAM Act will damage his reputation with Hispanic voters. Former Mississippi Governor Haley Barbour, a Republican, agreed with some of what Villaraigosa had to say, specifically the fact that Republicans needed to do more for their Hispanic constituents. “The fact that people come and serve in our military certainly ought to give them some status in the United States,” said Barbour, adding, “as long as they pay taxes, as long as they don’t break the law, now maybe there should be a different path to citizenship.” source (viafollow)
13:58 // 1 year ago
March 14, 2012

On the “go back to Mexico” guy and American history

thereluctantintellectual says: Let’s not forget history too. California was a part of Mexico before the Mexican-American War. The Mexican people who supported the US side of the war, usually large land owners were later pushed out of their land and gov’t by white migrants.

» SFB says: A great point we totally think this guy missed; thenoobyorker even used a vodka ad to sell a similar point. All vodka ads should be this informative, but if you’re looking for a little more … — Ernie @ SFB

21:58 // 2 years ago
21:12 // 2 years ago
November 25, 2011
latimes:

Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa ordered the shutdown of the Occupy L.A. encampment on City Hall grounds at 12:01 a.m. Monday, saying officials can no longer “maintain the public safety of a long-term encampment,” according to a statement issued Friday.
Photo: Park hours have been posted outside Los Angeles City Hall, reminding Occupy L.A. protesters of existing city codes that call for the lawn to be closed daily at 10:30 p.m. Credit: Robert Gauthier / Los Angeles Times

Here’s the notice.

latimes:

Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa ordered the shutdown of the Occupy L.A. encampment on City Hall grounds at 12:01 a.m. Monday, saying officials can no longer “maintain the public safety of a long-term encampment,” according to a statement issued Friday.

Photo: Park hours have been posted outside Los Angeles City Hall, reminding Occupy L.A. protesters of existing city codes that call for the lawn to be closed daily at 10:30 p.m. Credit: Robert Gauthier / Los Angeles Times

Here’s the notice.

20:11 // 2 years ago
The encampment in City Hall Park is not sustainable. This is especially true from the standpoint of public health and public safety. Accordingly, we must close, repair and re-open the park to public access. For this reason, we will close the park on Monday, November 28th at 12:01 am. The park closure will include a set of measures that will assist Occupy LA participants to move their personal belongings and property from the park. We will also offer social and health services for those in need.
Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa, in a statement regarding the eviction of Occupy L.A. protesters. The note takes a very conciliatory tone, one that reflects the positive relationship the movement has with the city: “It is my hope that we can conclude this first chapter of Occupy LA in a similar spirit,” the mayor writes. “I admire your courage and character. You have opened the eyes of your fellow citizens to the economic hardship in their midst. I am encouraged by your passionate commitment to social justice and look forward to the continued progress of your efforts.” 
20:04 // 2 years ago