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January 22, 2012

Ali Abdullah Saleh exits Yemen as anger over immunity deal rages

  • the deal Ali Abdullah Saleh agreed to give up his power in Yemen in exchange for immunity against prosecution in the country he led for more than three decades. Saleh, the fourth Arab Spring leader to lose power (and the third to relinquish it), apologized ”for any failure that occurred” during his rule.
  • the exit Now, as protests flare up against the sweetheart deal he got, Saleh is heading to the U.S. to get medical treatment for the injuries he sustained in an assassination attempt last year. Bro plans to return in time for elections next month, however — but not as the country’s leader.  source

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20:48 // 2 years ago
December 26, 2011
In the end, we felt there was enough good to be gained that it was worth managing the criticism that we’d get, including any comparisons to past episodes.
A U.S. official • Speaking about the decision to let Yemeni leader Ali Abdullah Saleh into the U.S. for medical reasons — which runs counter to what Saleh himself said a couple of days ago. The Yemeni leader claimed over the weekend that he would head to the U.S. just to get away from the region to let electoral officials do their work, but considering the fact that Saleh got burned so severely in his assassination attempt, the alternate story is by no means a surprise. By the way, when the official refers to “past episodes,” he means a 1979 episode where Jimmy Carter let an ailing Iranian shah into the U.S. — which angered officials in Iran. Already, similar concerns are coming up amongst Yemeni activists who worry the U.S. may give Saleh a safe harbor. source (viafollow)
20:09 // 2 years ago
December 24, 2011
I will go to the United States. Not for treatment, because I’m fine, but to get away from attention, cameras, and allow the unity government to prepare properly for elections. I’ll be there for several days, but I’ll return because I won’t leave my people and comrades who have been steadfast for 11 months. I’ll withdraw from political work and go into the street as part of the opposition.
Yemeni leader Ali Abdullah Saleh • Discussing his plans to leave Yemen soon, in an effort to give the government space so they can start the electoral process. This appears to be a major concession on the part of Saleh, as he’s gotten in the way of transition efforts in the past — especially prior to an assassination attempt earlier this year. Being halfway around the world, playing tourist in the U.S. (he’d get a kick out of Disney World), will probably go a long way towards encouraging peaceful elections in the country. source (viafollow)
12:21 // 2 years ago
November 23, 2011

Yemen’s Ali Abdullah Saleh agrees to end rule over Yemen

So long, Saleh: As we mentioned last night, reports had been swirling that Ali Abdullah Saleh, the embattled (and battling, judging from the violence his government wrought against citizen protests) leader of Yemen, had arrived in Saudi Arabia to strike an agreement with the opposition to end his rule. Today, the New York Times has reported that exactly that took place: Saleh signed on to an end to his 33-year tenure, but he will officially retain the title of “President” until new elections are held three months from now. Whether this is truly the end of Saleh’s influence in Yemeni politics is unclear, however — his family still holds many powerful positions in Yemen’s military and intelligence agencies. source

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14:29 // 2 years ago
Will Yemen’s Ali Abdullah Saleh sign a deal for his exit? He’s supposedly going to sign the GCC-backed plan very soon, but he’s known for backing out of agreements, so excuse us for possibly being cynical. He’s also known, however, for getting significant burns all over his body, so that might play a factor in what he’ll do.

Will Yemen’s Ali Abdullah Saleh sign a deal for his exit? He’s supposedly going to sign the GCC-backed plan very soon, but he’s known for backing out of agreements, so excuse us for possibly being cynical. He’s also known, however, for getting significant burns all over his body, so that might play a factor in what he’ll do.

1:13 // 2 years ago
October 8, 2011

Yemeni opposition not exactly buying Saleh resignation claims

  • claim Longstanding Yemeni President Ali Abdullah Saleh, fresh from recovering from an assassination attempt that left most of his body burned, claimed on state television that he would be resigning from office soon. Finally.
  • dismissal However, Saleh has made this type of claim on three separate occasions since April, a period which included months of incapacitation. The boy who cried wolf? More like the leader that cried “stepping down!” source

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23:16 // 2 years ago
September 23, 2011

This video really needs Eminem’s “Without Me” as its soundtrack. Three months after an assassination attempt that nearly took his life and left much of his body burned, Yemeni president Ali Abdullah Saleh is back in Sanaa, looking pretty good for a guy who had 40 percent of his body burned. Saleh returns to Yemen at a time of increased tension in the country —including violence that’s killed over 100 in the past week alone. source

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8:20 // 2 years ago
August 22, 2011
washingtonpoststyle:

theatlantic:

Qaddafi with Mubarak and Ben Ali, One Year Ago

 
Taken less than a year before, the photo captured the ear-to-ear smiles of the leaders of several autocratic regimes. At the center of the photo stood Gaddafi, smiling and resplendent in his golden-brown robes and trademark sunglasses.
To his far left stood then-Tunisian President Zine El Abidine Ben Ali, laughing, and looking for all the world like he was invincible. To his right stood then-Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak, with Gaddafi’s elbow jauntily on his soldier.

 
Via The Washington Post

Via us.

Saleh’s in there too! It’s like the genesis of the Arab Spring, in a single room.

washingtonpoststyle:

theatlantic:

Qaddafi with Mubarak and Ben Ali, One Year Ago

Taken less than a year before, the photo captured the ear-to-ear smiles of the leaders of several autocratic regimes. At the center of the photo stood Gaddafi, smiling and resplendent in his golden-brown robes and trademark sunglasses.

To his far left stood then-Tunisian President Zine El Abidine Ben Ali, laughing, and looking for all the world like he was invincible. To his right stood then-Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak, with Gaddafi’s elbow jauntily on his soldier.

Via The Washington Post

Via us.

Saleh’s in there too! It’s like the genesis of the Arab Spring, in a single room.

(via nightline)

10:55 // 3 years ago
July 7, 2011
Recovering Yemeni President Saleh shows up on television
President Ali Abdullah Saleh showed up on Yemeni television in a prerecorded speech about his health. He was wounded and severely burned in a bomb blast at his palace earlier this month, and has gone through 8 surgeries since then. He’s making the speech to ensure the people of Yemen that he is recovering, but it’s unclear how true that is — he hasn’t been seen in public since the incident last month. (Photo via Aljazeera) source
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President Ali Abdullah Saleh showed up on Yemeni television in a prerecorded speech about his health. He was wounded and severely burned in a bomb blast at his palace earlier this month, and has gone through 8 surgeries since then. He’s making the speech to ensure the people of Yemen that he is recovering, but it’s unclear how true that is — he hasn’t been seen in public since the incident last month. (Photo via Aljazeera) source

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14:03 // 3 years ago
June 26, 2011
He will appear within the next 48 hours despite our fear that the burns on his features and on different parts of his body will be an obstacle given that his appearance will not be as the media expects it.
Ali Abdullah Saleh’s media secretary, Ahmed al-Sufi • Suggesting that Saleh will return to Yemen soon after spending weeks recovering in Saudi Arabia after his palace suffered a raid earlier this month. He suffered severe burns, but they cover less than 40 percent of his body … you know, not that much. As you might guess, hundreds of thousands of protesters aren’t taking this news well at all — they’re pushing for members of Saleh’s inner circle, including his sons, to leave the country. source (viafollow)
11:44 // 3 years ago