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November 20, 2013

Shocking figures emerge after Algeria tops Burkina Faso in World Cup qualifier

  • 12 people died during the celebrations that followed Algeria’s 1-0 win over Burkina Faso on Tuesday, a win that guaranteed the country I spot in the 2014 FIFA World Cup. Nine of the twelve died in automotive accidents.
  • 240 people have also been confirmed injured in the twenty-four hours since the win, as celebrations persisted throughout heavy rains on Tuesday night. source
18:19 // 9 months ago
March 2, 2013
On Saturday, March 2, at noon, Chadian armed forces operating in northern Mali completely destroyed a terrorist base. …The toll included several dead terrorists, including their leader Mokhtar Belmokhtar.
A statement from the Chadian armed forces • Announcing the killing of Mokhtar Belmokhtar, an al-Qaeda commander who claimed responsibility for masterminding a lethal hostage situation at an Algerian gas plant in January. Chad’s President Idriss Deby also announced Friday that his forces had killed Adelhamid Abou Zeid, another prominent al-Qaeda commander, in the same area as the attack that killed Belmokhtar. The French, who launched jet strikes on mountain regions in Northern Mali believed to house bases for Islamic militants, have not yet confirmed the deaths of either Belmokhtar or Abou Zeid. source
20:26 // 1 year ago
February 23, 2013
This is the final phase of the process since it is in that massif [the Ifoghas mountains] that AQIM forces have probably regrouped. Our Chadian friends launched an attack yesterday which was very harsh with significant loss of life. I want to praise what the Chadians are doing.
French President Francois Hollande • Speaking on his nation’s military collaboration, along with African forces, against al-Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb, a militant group in Mali now waging a weakening insurgency in the country’s far north. The group had claimed control of broad swaths of northern Mali in 2012, causing the government to request international military help, which Hollande and France (Mali was a French colony until 1960) have provided in the form of 4,000 soldiers deployed. And lest you think there’s a military operation of this sort the United States isn’t involved in, predator drones have been offered to the effort as well, which U.S. officials claim will be used to glean deployment information. source
20:29 // 1 year ago
January 22, 2013
16:21 // 1 year ago
January 21, 2013
15:24 // 1 year ago
January 19, 2013

Algerian hostage crisis reportedly ends after final assault

  • 23hostages killed, at least, in a gas plant in Algeria over the last few days. The hostages had been held by an al-Qaeda-linked group, which took over the gas facility in retaliation, it’s suspected by Algerian authorities, for allowing France to use their airspace to attack Islamic militants in neighboring Mali. The nationalities of the slain hostages are not yet abundantly clear, though reports have indicated there were Americans as well as British, Japanese, Norwegian, French, Romanian, and Malaysian citizens held in the facility. 32 of the militants involved were also slain in the Algerian military attacks. source
15:24 // 1 year ago
January 18, 2013
The Algerian hostage crisis isn’t over yet, Cameron says: Speaking to the House of Commons this morning, British Prime Minister David Cameron described the crisis as an “ongoing operation,” with Algerian forces working to capture the suspects, along with at least some of the hostages. “This is a large and complex site and they are still pursuing terrorists and possibly some of the hostages,” Cameron was quoted as saying. Exact numbers haven’t been verified at this point, and multiple sources are reporting different things. Cameron noted the British government’s frustration that the Algerian government started their mission without consulting British officials. (They offered their help, which the Algerians declined.)

The Algerian hostage crisis isn’t over yet, Cameron says: Speaking to the House of Commons this morning, British Prime Minister David Cameron described the crisis as an “ongoing operation,” with Algerian forces working to capture the suspects, along with at least some of the hostages. “This is a large and complex site and they are still pursuing terrorists and possibly some of the hostages,” Cameron was quoted as saying. Exact numbers haven’t been verified at this point, and multiple sources are reporting different things. Cameron noted the British government’s frustration that the Algerian government started their mission without consulting British officials. (They offered their help, which the Algerians declined.)

8:34 // 1 year ago
January 17, 2013
They (Algerians) are likely to feel vindicated, and to reject any criticism for their reaction to a domestic crisis they feel were brought about by Western actions they advised against.
Geoff Porter of North Africa Risk Consulting • Discussing the current situation with the Algerian hostage crisis, which ended violently and has featured wildly varying reports regarding death toll. Porter is referring to Algerian officials’ position that Western officials should not have intervened in the region. The hostage situation took place at a natural gas complex deep in the Sahara desert, and hostages were of numerous nationalities, including American.
19:29 // 1 year ago
17:47 // 1 year ago

Hostage situation turns deadly during second day of Algerian gas field takeover

  • 7 foreign hostages were killed following a botched helicopter attack on a militant-used vehicle on Thursday. Government forces say that 8 gunmen aligned with militant leader Mokhtar Belmokhtar were also inside of a vehicle targeted by the helicopter, all of whom are believed to have been killed as well.
  • 25 foreign hostages have escaped from their captors, though the number is heavily disputed by other media outlets from the region. In fact, Al-Jazeera claims the number couldn’t possibly be true because the network believes more than 30 hostages were killed in the helicopter attack. Regardless of debate on those free or killed, there does seem to be a consensus that AQIM forces still have 7 foreign hostages inside the complex.
  • 150 Algerian workers are believed to still be inside of the complex, though it is unknown where and under what conditions they are being held by Belmokhtar’s militants. An estimated 600 workers fled the compound when their attackers arrived on Wednesday, leaving well over a hundred workers that are unfortunately viewed as expendable in the majority of these situations. source
14:30 // 1 year ago