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September 28, 2012
An amusing consequence of state-controlled media: In countries with a closed press, satire, by definition, doesn’t exist, and so when satirical pieces leak over from other countries, they’re often interpreted as real news. In other words, Iranians have more of an excuse for mistaking The Onion for reality than these people do. source

An amusing consequence of state-controlled media: In countries with a closed press, satire, by definition, doesn’t exist, and so when satirical pieces leak over from other countries, they’re often interpreted as real news. In other words, Iranians have more of an excuse for mistaking The Onion for reality than these people do. source

20:23 // 1 year ago
September 22, 2011
16:36 // 2 years ago
July 25, 2011

Iran to pull the plug on the Internet in two years’ time

  • 2 years until Iranians get their Internet revoked source

» Although only 11% of Iran’s citizens use the Internet, Iranian officials have nonetheless decided that within the next two years, all Internet access in the country will be restricted to a state-controlled intranet. Which is to say there will be no Internet access in Iran. (Note from editor: This story is a little old. So as not to be giving you completely outdated information, we’ll point out that officials plan to roll out tests of their “National Internet” starting next month.)

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23:33 // 2 years ago
May 6, 2011
15:06 // 2 years ago
May 5, 2011

On rumors about Mahmoud Ahmadinejad’s resignation

We’ve seen a couple posts in our dashboard about Ahmadinejad resigning. The sources in these pieces are Current TV and Examiner.com, two user-generated content sites. Now, while there is drama around Ahmadinejad right now — including staffers reportedly charged with sorcery of all things and the Iranian president disappearing from the public eye for nearly two weeks — we’ve seen no reports suggesting that Ahmadinejad has actually resigned outside of those two sites. Nothing on Twitter, even. Nothing against Examiner.com, but it does not have a strong reputation due to the way it handles content. Do yourself a favor and heed what mohandasgandhi says here: “Take this with a huge grain of salt.” (EDIT: Please see our update on this story.)

22:02 // 2 years ago
April 7, 2011
zeitvox:

Iran’s Blue-Collar Revolution

[the working class] have historically made up a significant portion of Ahmadinejad’s base. Their loyalty cemented with generous government largesse, they mostly stayed on the side of the president after the contested June 2009 election, when thousands of protesters took to the streets to denounce the results. Those discontents called themselves the Green Movement, drawn primarily from the ranks of the middle class, intelligentsia, and students. The underclass, still loyal to the regime and Ahmadinejad, became known as the Blues
… As its leaders understand, the Green Movement’s future hinges crucially on its ability to make common cause with the Blues. The continued deterioration of the economy creates that opportunity  >read more<

Though the “The Blues are going Green” argument may be cause for hope, perhaps causing existential angst among the Basij “enforcers”, there may also be reason for dread. The crisis in Bahrain - featuring Saudi aid in the brutal marginalization of the 70% Shia majority - could provide a useful pretext for Iranian brinkmanship in the Gulf.  It wouldn’t be the first time domestic political woes enticed leaders into working national aspirations toward an external focus.

zeitvox:

Iran’s Blue-Collar Revolution

[the working class] have historically made up a significant portion of Ahmadinejad’s base. Their loyalty cemented with generous government largesse, they mostly stayed on the side of the president after the contested June 2009 election, when thousands of protesters took to the streets to denounce the results. Those discontents called themselves the Green Movement, drawn primarily from the ranks of the middle class, intelligentsia, and students. The underclass, still loyal to the regime and Ahmadinejad, became known as the Blues

… As its leaders understand, the Green Movement’s future hinges crucially on its ability to make common cause with the Blues. The continued deterioration of the economy creates that opportunity  >read more<

Though the “The Blues are going Green” argument may be cause for hope, perhaps causing existential angst among the Basij “enforcers”, there may also be reason for dread. The crisis in Bahrain - featuring Saudi aid in the brutal marginalization of the 70% Shia majority - could provide a useful pretext for Iranian brinkmanship in the Gulf.  It wouldn’t be the first time domestic political woes enticed leaders into working national aspirations toward an external focus.

1:46 // 3 years ago
February 8, 2011
Undoubtedly, the starting point of what we are witnessing in the streets of Tunis, Sana’a, Cairo, Alexandria and Suez should be seen in the Iranian protests.
Iranian “Green” leader Mir Hossein Mousavi • The opposition leader, whose unsuccessful run against Mahmoud Ahmadinejad sparked anti-government protests within Iran, has called for demonstrations to be held in solidarity with revolutionary movements in other states. That this sort of call has gone out isn’t especially surprising in a geopolitical climate of profound uncertainty in the wake of Egypt’s civil uprising. With an increasingly modern, culturally westernized population block that is nearly 50% under the age of 30, the extent to which Iran is ripe for such an upheaval has been a weighty topic since the protests over 2009’s fraudulent election. Seeing other oppressors fall by the wayside can, one suspects, only help this possibility. source (viafollow)
14:43 // 3 years ago
January 23, 2011
If the other party is determined and committed to law, justice and respect, there is hope that in the next sessions good results would be achieved.
Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad • Blaming the people on the other side of the table for failing to make a nuclear deal happen. Because, let’s face it, he has to give a little bit of rope for the rest of the world to pull on, or they’re going to slip and fall – and never believe Ahmadinejad’s dishonesty again. source (viafollow)
10:45 // 3 years ago