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March 25, 2012

Families of Afghanistan shooting victims receive money from U.S.

  • $850k the amount the U.S. government paid to victims’ families in the Afghanistan shooting
  • $50k the amount the family of each person killed received from the U.S. government
  • $10k the amount the family of each person injured received from the U.S. government source

» Meant as compensation? According to Afghan official Haji Nyamat Khan (a Kandahar provincial council member), he U.S. government offered the money as a way to help the families, not solely as compensation. But a NATO official disputed that, specifically saying it was meant as compensation. Whether or not this is the case could be significant, as “blood money” can be used as a way to replace a trial in Afghanistan. The suspect in the shooting, U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Robert Bales, is currently getting tried in the U.S., but many Afghan want him to be tried there.

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10:22 // 2 years ago
March 22, 2012
18:32 // 2 years ago
March 21, 2012

Lawyer for soldier: “There’s no medical examiner’s evidence” linking my client to massacre

The lawyer for US Army Staff Sergeant Robert Bales, the soldier who stands accused of massacring 16 Afghan citizens on March 11, 2012, claims there is no evidence linking his client to the killings in a new interview with the Guardian. John Henry Browne says his client has “some memories of what occurred that evening, before the supposed incident, and he has some memories of what happened after the alleged incident,” but has no recollection of the time in-between.

16:41 // 2 years ago
March 19, 2012
newsflick:

No one asked their names | By Qais Azimy AJE

In the days following the rogue US soldier’s shooting spree in Kandahar, most of the media, us included, focused on the “backlash” and how it might further strain the relations with the US.
Many mainstream media outlets channelled a significant amount of  energy into uncovering the slightest detail about the accused soldier – now identified as Staff Sergeant Robert Bales. We even know where his wife wanted to go for vacation, or what she said on her personal blog.
But the victims became a footnote, an anonymous footnote. Just the number 16. No one bothered to ask their ages, their hobbies, their aspirations. Worst of all, no one bothered to ask their names.
In honoring their memory, I write their names below, and the little we know about them: that nine of them were children, three were women.
The dead:
Mohamed Dawood son of  Abdullah
Khudaydad son of Mohamed Juma
Nazar Mohamed 
Payendo
Robeena
Shatarina daughter of Sultan Mohamed
Zahra daughter of Abdul Hamid
Nazia daughter of Dost Mohamed
Masooma daughter of Mohamed Wazir 
Farida daughter of Mohamed Wazir
Palwasha daughter of Mohamed Wazir
Nabia daughter of Mohamed Wazir
Esmatullah daughter of Mohamed Wazir
Faizullah son of Mohamed Wazir
Essa Mohamed son of Mohamed Hussain
Akhtar Mohamed son of Murrad Ali 
The wounded:
Haji Mohamed Naim son of Haji Sakhawat
Mohamed Sediq son of Mohamed Naim
Parween
Rafiullah
Zardana
Zulheja


This post makes a good point. The priorities of the U.S. media are so out of whack in cases like these that these things don’t get reported. They become meaningless statistics, blips on a radar that don’t register. There’s a campaign to be had here. The next time Afghan civilians die at the hands of the U.S. military, the NY Times, WaPo and other mainstream media outlets should put as much work into finding out about the people who died as they do the suspect. This is a war full of “forgotten” deaths. The media should be doing more to prevent them from being forgotten.

newsflick:

No one asked their names | By Qais Azimy AJE

In the days following the rogue US soldier’s shooting spree in Kandahar, most of the media, us included, focused on the “backlash” and how it might further strain the relations with the US.

Many mainstream media outlets channelled a significant amount of  energy into uncovering the slightest detail about the accused soldier – now identified as Staff Sergeant Robert Bales. We even know where his wife wanted to go for vacation, or what she said on her personal blog.

But the victims became a footnote, an anonymous footnote. Just the number 16. No one bothered to ask their ages, their hobbies, their aspirations. Worst of all, no one bothered to ask their names.

In honoring their memory, I write their names below, and the little we know about them: that nine of them were children, three were women.

The dead:

  • Mohamed Dawood son of  Abdullah
  • Khudaydad son of Mohamed Juma
  • Nazar Mohamed 
  • Payendo
  • Robeena
  • Shatarina daughter of Sultan Mohamed
  • Zahra daughter of Abdul Hamid
  • Nazia daughter of Dost Mohamed
  • Masooma daughter of Mohamed Wazir 
  • Farida daughter of Mohamed Wazir
  • Palwasha daughter of Mohamed Wazir
  • Nabia daughter of Mohamed Wazir
  • Esmatullah daughter of Mohamed Wazir
  • Faizullah son of Mohamed Wazir
  • Essa Mohamed son of Mohamed Hussain
  • Akhtar Mohamed son of Murrad Ali 

The wounded:

  • Haji Mohamed Naim son of Haji Sakhawat
  • Mohamed Sediq son of Mohamed Naim
  • Parween
  • Rafiullah
  • Zardana
  • Zulheja

This post makes a good point. The priorities of the U.S. media are so out of whack in cases like these that these things don’t get reported. They become meaningless statistics, blips on a radar that don’t register. There’s a campaign to be had here. The next time Afghan civilians die at the hands of the U.S. military, the NY Times, WaPo and other mainstream media outlets should put as much work into finding out about the people who died as they do the suspect. This is a war full of “forgotten” deaths. The media should be doing more to prevent them from being forgotten.

(via pantslessprogressive)

21:46 // 2 years ago
March 18, 2012

Three things we know about Afghan shooting suspect Robert Bales

  • one Bales, who joined the Army two months after 9/11, was reportedly suffering from a series of financial troubles. He and his wife tried to put their home on the market days before the incident.
  • two He also suffered from a series of legal problems, including past domestic violence allegations against an old girlfriend and a hit-and-run incident which took place while he wore military clothing.
  • three Bales, who had been hoping for a promotion or transfer, had been turned down for a promotion in the past year, which led to his current deployment in Afghanistan. source

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9:48 // 2 years ago
March 16, 2012
There will be efforts to paint him as a rogue soldier rather than focusing on how we treat GIs in general or whether we should be over there to begin with.
Attorney John Henry Browne • Discussing his client, the soldier accused of killing 16 Afghan civilians last week. Browne, who spoke on The Today Show this morning, said the case against his client was “more political than legal” and that the defense would likely focus on the client having post-traumatic stress disorder.
9:12 // 2 years ago
March 15, 2012
Afghan security forces have the ability to keep the security in rural areas and in villages on their own.
Afghan leader Hamid Karzai • Saying in a statement that he wants international troops out of Afghan villages for good, in the wake of a deadly shooting of Afghan civilians by a U.S. soldier. In related news, peace talks between the Afghan Taliban and U.S. broke down Thursday.
8:19 // 2 years ago
March 14, 2012
Pentagon: Panetta, other government officials not hurt by truck explosion
US Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta is safe after a stolen pickup truck exploded near the runway where his plane was scheduled to land during a trip to Afghanistan. Although all of the pieces of the story are still being put together, no evidence of explosive material was found in/near the truck, and the driver may have simply lost control of the vehicle. Navy Capt. John Kirby, a Pentagon spokesman, confirmed that truck’s driver is currently being treated for burn injuries, and that no one else was injured in the incident. (Photo via the Office of the Secretary of Defense) source
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US Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta is safe after a stolen pickup truck exploded near the runway where his plane was scheduled to land during a trip to Afghanistan. Although all of the pieces of the story are still being put together, no evidence of explosive material was found in/near the truck, and the driver may have simply lost control of the vehicle. Navy Capt. John Kirby, a Pentagon spokesman, confirmed that truck’s driver is currently being treated for burn injuries, and that no one else was injured in the incident. (Photo via the Office of the Secretary of Defense) source

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16:10 // 2 years ago
March 13, 2012

Taliban fighters opened fire at a memorial service honoring the 16 Afghans killed by an American soldier on Sunday, in an attempt to take the lives of Qayum Karzai, Shah Wali Karzai, and other government officials. Both men, brothers of Afghan President Hamid Karzai, escaped the 20-minute battle unharmed; however, one Afghan soldier was killed and two others wounded during the fighting. source

16:57 // 2 years ago
This is not the first of those events, and it probably won’t be the last. But we cannot allow these events to undermine our strategy or the mission that we’re involved in.
Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta • While discussing the recent shooting of 16 Afghan citizens, by a member of the U.S. military, with reporters on flight to Kyrgyzstan. During his remarks, the Secretary of Defense also mentioned that the government’s goal was to see the suspect tried in the U.S. military justice system. Panetta’s comments come amid increasingly loud calls for the soldier in question to face trial in Afghanistan, and for the United States to re-evaluate its long-term plans for operating inside the country. The calls have grown louder in recent weeks after a series of incidents including Sunday’s shooting, and the mass-burning of Korans at Bagram Air Base last month. source (viafollow)
13:50 // 2 years ago