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March 22, 2014

The U.S. doesn’t like hummus as much as everyone else. Why is that?

  • 26% the percentage of Americans that regularly buy hummus. Another 80 million americans don’t even know what the hell hummus is. Hummus, one of the world’s most popular foods, has failed to successfully crack the American market the way that, say, Ranch dressing has, but that’s not for lack of trying. The hummus-producing giant Sabra, owned by Pepsico, is going out of its way to sell Middle America on the idea that ground chickpeas are awesome. source
16:37 // 4 weeks ago
15:10 // 4 weeks ago

Russia’s financial systems not looking so hot at the moment. Wonder why?

  • 21% the decline in Russia’s stock market thus far this year, a market which will be facing even more pressure due to fresh sanctions on the country. Oh yeah, good luck trying to use your Visa or Mastercard, Russian bank customers. source
12:08 // 4 weeks ago
The Pakistani version of The New York Times’ international edition was missing something. Wondering what it was? Click here. (ht Gawker)

The Pakistani version of The New York Times’ international edition was missing something. Wondering what it was? Click here. (ht Gawker)

11:59 // 4 weeks ago
March 21, 2014
An Open Letter to the Creators of 2048-Related Clones

A short while ago, a simple game called 2048 entered my life, like many lives before mine, through a link on the internet. The game asks not much of its users—combine blocks, one at a time, multiplying numbers quickly. Most people aren’t very successful at the game at first, though it’s beatable with a specific strategy. (Hint: Always keep the highest number in the bottom right corner, then use the top right corner to feed numbers from the top to the bottom. You will win almost every time if you use this strategy.)

This game is more addictive than a Flappy Bird Think Piece.

But there’s a problem. 2048, itself a clone of a number of other games, was open-sourced on Github and made known on Hacker News, one of my favorite sites. Since then, we’ve seen variations of the game that have somehow made the game even harder. we’ve seen clones parodying obscure jokes on British television or even honoring well-known British television shows.

The kicker for me? Oh, the kicker? This. Fucking. Variation. I have a hard enough time dealing with squares, and now you’re going to hand me a hexagon? I don’t know how you sleep at night.

Please stop, developers. I have some self-control, but not enough to avoid a game which is available in a Tetris-style version.

I won’t ask again. I will be too busy defeating a Bitcoin-themed version of the game that is so addictive that it will make me forget to go to work every day for an entire month, because I’ll be busy trying to play the game in an effort to mine Bitcoins for myself. I hope you’re happy, developers.

An Open Letter to the Creators of 2048-Related Clones

A short while ago, a simple game called 2048 entered my life, like many lives before mine, through a link on the internet. The game asks not much of its users—combine blocks, one at a time, multiplying numbers quickly. Most people aren’t very successful at the game at first, though it’s beatable with a specific strategy. (Hint: Always keep the highest number in the bottom right corner, then use the top right corner to feed numbers from the top to the bottom. You will win almost every time if you use this strategy.)

This game is more addictive than a Flappy Bird Think Piece.

But there’s a problem. 2048, itself a clone of a number of other games, was open-sourced on Github and made known on Hacker News, one of my favorite sites. Since then, we’ve seen variations of the game that have somehow made the game even harder. we’ve seen clones parodying obscure jokes on British television or even honoring well-known British television shows.

The kicker for me? Oh, the kicker? This. Fucking. Variation. I have a hard enough time dealing with squares, and now you’re going to hand me a hexagon? I don’t know how you sleep at night.

Please stop, developers. I have some self-control, but not enough to avoid a game which is available in a Tetris-style version.

I won’t ask again. I will be too busy defeating a Bitcoin-themed version of the game that is so addictive that it will make me forget to go to work every day for an entire month, because I’ll be busy trying to play the game in an effort to mine Bitcoins for myself. I hope you’re happy, developers.

22:35 // 4 weeks ago
This one political elitist put his own personal views above the will of the people, arrogantly ruling that all 2.7 million voters were ‘irrational’ in their commonsense belief that the ideal environment for every child is having both a mother and a father committed to each other and to their children in marriage.
Gary Glenn, President of the American Family Association of Michigan • Ripping the court decision to overturn the state’s ban on gay marriage. It’s OK, Gary. Your kind is dying out.
22:18 // 4 weeks ago

Sick kid given experimental drug after social media campaign, and guess what? It worked.

  • cause Josh Hardy, 7, was suffering from a severe battle with adenovirus due to a weakened immune system. However, the maker of brincidofovir, an experimental drug which would have allowed him to fight the disease, refused to give him the treatment. (By the way, we should note that Hardy has beaten cancer FOUR times.)
  • effect His family launched a media campaign to convince the company, Chimerix, to give him the drug. Eventually, the campaign proved successful enough that the company worked out a deal with the FDA to give him the drug.
  • result After Hardy was given just three doses of the drug, his condition improved dramatically—from 250,000 copies of the disease per milliliter to 367 copies per milliliter. He’s expected to adenovirus-free by early next week. source
22:00 // 4 weeks ago
March 20, 2014
17:54 // 1 month ago

General avoids prison time and loss of benefits with plea deal

  • Zero The number of hours that Brigadier General Jeffrey A. Sinclair will spend behind bars, thanks to a plea deal that saw the alleged rapist accept responsibility for military crimes that would not be considered criminal in a civilian court. In exchange, prosecutors agreed to drop both of the sexual assault charges against Sinclair, clearing the way for a sentence that includes little real punishment other than the revocation of four months’ pay. Because justice, or something. More details here.
15:13 // 1 month ago
14:42 // 1 month ago