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May 21, 2014
inothernews:

newsweek:

This is how the VA calculates monthly payments for wounded soldiers, per the Washington Post. 

Now let’s see bar graphs about how long each of those soldiers have to wait for treatment.

inothernews:

newsweek:

This is how the VA calculates monthly payments for wounded soldiers, per the Washington Post

Now let’s see bar graphs about how long each of those soldiers have to wait for treatment.

23:29 // 2 months ago
The Marathon bombs were constructed using improvised fuses made from Christmas lights and improvised, remote-control detonators fashioned from model car parts. These relatively sophisticated devices would have been difficult for the Tsarnaevs to fabricate successfully without training or assistance from others.
A court filing by federal prosecutors • Discussing the parts that went into the explosive devices used in the Boston Marathon bombing. The issue came up in regards to Dzhokhar Tsarnaev’s questioning—the surviving suspect in the attack repeatedly asked for a lawyer during his first hours in captivity, but was not given one. Federal investigators argue that they had just cause to question him at the time because the bombs were sophisticated enough that it was believed there were accomplices that helped. 
23:18 // 2 months ago
May 20, 2014

Pat Sajak writes crazy tweet. Science blogger posts perfect response. The end.

18:46 // 2 months ago
May 19, 2014
20:49 // 2 months ago
The public do not need to panic but can still live their lives as normal.
A message on Thailand’s military-run television station, informing the public that martial law has been declared in the country due to a worsening political situation. The goal, they say, is not to launch a military coup of the country, but “to preserve law and order.” It’s the first time since 2006 that martial law has been declared in the country.
20:42 // 2 months ago
The sound of unintended consequences: A recent regulatory change threatened to make it difficult to export vintage guitars overseas, or sell them across state lines, due to the fact that many guitars made prior to the 1970s—particularly those made by C.F. Martin and Co.—were made with ivory at a time when doing so was still legal because such elephants weren’t endangered. The rule change, which banned the export and import of ivory in nearly any form, was intended to discourage elephant poaching, but ended up angering musicians who owned the valuable instruments and simply wanted to play these very-expensive instruments on tour. 
Now, a federal agency says that they’re changing the rule to allow the instruments to fly overseas. But if you’d like to sell one, it’s still gonna be a pain in the butt.

The sound of unintended consequences: A recent regulatory change threatened to make it difficult to export vintage guitars overseas, or sell them across state lines, due to the fact that many guitars made prior to the 1970s—particularly those made by C.F. Martin and Co.—were made with ivory at a time when doing so was still legal because such elephants weren’t endangered. The rule change, which banned the export and import of ivory in nearly any form, was intended to discourage elephant poaching, but ended up angering musicians who owned the valuable instruments and simply wanted to play these very-expensive instruments on tour. 

Now, a federal agency says that they’re changing the rule to allow the instruments to fly overseas. But if you’d like to sell one, it’s still gonna be a pain in the butt.

20:32 // 2 months ago
I am disappointed that those who wanted to criticize Birgeneau’s handling of events at Berkeley chose to send him such an intemperate list of ‘demands.’ In my view, they should have encouraged him to come and engage in a genuine discussion, not to come, tail between his legs, to respond to an indictment that a self-chosen jury had reached without hearing counter-arguments.

William G. Bowen, the former president of Princeton University • Scolding people who disagreed with Robert J. Birgeneau, the former UC Berkeley chancellor that Bowen replaced as Haverford College’s commencement speaker, on Sunday. Birgeneau stepped down as speaker as a direct result of controversy related to his handling of protesters at Berkeley in 2011. The protesters set demands on Birgeneau, sending him a letter with nine conditions that they expected him to meet as commencement speaker. (Obviously, he stayed home.)

But Bowen didn’t give Birgeneau a pass, either, stating during the commencement speech: “I think that Birgeneau, in turn, responded intemperately, failing to make proper allowance for the immature, and, yes, arrogant inclinations of some protestors. Aggravated as he had every right to be, I think he should be with us today.”

10:47 // 2 months ago
In New York City, there are about 323,900 people who are out of work, labor statistics show, enough to populate a sizable metropolis. They are your neighbors, your fellow congregants, some of the men and women crammed beside you on the subway or bus. Day in and day out, they are coping with upended lives, struggling to squeeze back into a work force that has squeezed them out.
Nine Months Later, Still Working to Find a Job - NYTimes.com (via rubenfeld)

(via rubenfeld)

8:30 // 2 months ago
May 18, 2014

AT&T learns an important lesson about massive mergers

  • then In an effort to expand its mobile base, AT&T attempted to buy T-Mobile for $39 billion a couple years back, only to be rebuffed by federal regulators due to antitrust concerns. The situation was very costly for AT&T, which had to pay a $4 billion break-up fee over the failure of the deal.
  • now Clearly finding that a mobile merger is not in the cards, AT&T announced a $48.5 billion buyout attempt of satellite giant DirecTV. Unlike the T-Mobile deal, no break-up fee is tied to the purchase—on AT&T’s end. If another suitor is found by DirecTV, however, the TV company will have to pay the phone company $1.4 billion in fees. source
23:07 // 2 months ago
South Korean President Park Geun-hye says that the country’s coast guard has been so ineffective in the wake of the recent ferry disaster that she’s pushing to disband it altogether. ”The coast guard’s rescue operations were virtually a failure,” she said. Her goal would be to put the responsibility of the coast guard in the hands of other organizations, including the National Police Agency. Park has publicly apologized for what happened on three separate occasions.

South Korean President Park Geun-hye says that the country’s coast guard has been so ineffective in the wake of the recent ferry disaster that she’s pushing to disband it altogether. ”The coast guard’s rescue operations were virtually a failure,” she said. Her goal would be to put the responsibility of the coast guard in the hands of other organizations, including the National Police Agency. Park has publicly apologized for what happened on three separate occasions.

22:59 // 2 months ago